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Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
mohamed morsi returned to cairo palace after fleeing last night. tens of thousands of protesting the constitution, the trap is set for a vote on december 15. riot police have been deployed to separate supporters and opponents of president morsi. anti-morsi protesters that he is stripped judiciary of power and rushing through his constitution backed by largely islamist handle. egyptian president has said the referendum vote on the constitution draft will go on as planned despite protests. lori: it is a shocking. unreal. melissa: paying the price for hurricane sandy, fema asking for more money to foot the bill. how does the federal government plan to pay for this? lori: the social networking site moving up in the world. how investors could benefit the head. want to try to crack it? yeah, that's the way to do it! now we need a little bit more... [ male announcer ] at humana, we understand the value of quality time and personal attentio which is why we are proud to partner with health care professionals who understand the difference that quality time with our members can make... that
: and to egypt. within the last 24 hours the country has seen the worst violence since president mohamed morsi was elected in june. seven people were killed and more than 600 hurt during overnight clashes in cairo outside the presidential palace. we have a report from jonathan rugman of "independent television news." >> reporter: last year, they ousted a dictator. last night, they turned against one another. religious and secular egyptians fighting outside the palace of their first freely-elected president. after riot police gave up keeping the two warring sides apart. seven people were killed and hundreds were injured. both sides were armed with clubs, but eyewitnesses said the first gunfire came from president morsi's supporters. the president's opponents let off fireworks. but they say they won't back down until the president gives up sweeping new powers or resigns. this morning, the army moved in. not to mount a military coup, but to defend a president they would once have jailed for his political views. the commander of these troops said these tanks were just to keep rival factions apart.
fogood o ill and embodied what was important about the year. the magazine's list included mohamed morsi, tim cook and malala yousafzai, the pakistani teach ager shot for advocating girl's education. rick stengel joins me now. he's the managing editor of time. how do you go about selecting the person of the year. and in the end you decide. >> and in the end i decide. >> rose: don't you love privilege? >> (laughs) it weighs on your shoulders alwa time, as you know. probably beginning in the middle of the year we start thinking about it, a month or so later i start asking people like you, members of the "time" 100, our correspondents, editors, writers start sending in suggestions and have meetings and then we start talking about ideas, tloung out names, sometimes it's not a person but a group of people, like last year, the protest. the end we whittle it down to a short list and then we choose. >> what is it you that you measure them by? >> it's a historical thing, charlie. you measure them in part by past person of the year winners. i always like to feel the person who wins person of the y
, this is in cairo. it was there last night that supporters and owe points of president mohamed morsi clashed. they hurled rocks and molotov cocktails at each other. at least five people were killed, hundreds injured. the root of the violence is what many believe is morsi's grab for power. ian lee joins us this morning. what's happening right now. >> reporter: we have the elite republican guard, the people tasked with protecting the president. they are putting up barbed wire and road blocks, diverting traffic and people away and trying to keep the two sides, the pro-morsi and the anti-morsi protesters away from each other. last flight we saw thousands of pro-morsi supporters camp outside of the presidential palace, that is after they went there and removed, by force, the anti-morsi protesters. but now we have a small -- protests are planned for today against morsi and their plan to defe descend, again, on the presidential palace. >> a direct constitution has been approved and egyptians are scheduled to vote on it next week. is there something in this proposal that has protesters so angry? >>
. megyn: live pictures of the growing protests in egypt. protests over egypt's president mohamed morsi giving himself sweeping powers. now the violence erupting outside the presidential palace in cairo. today's massive march comes as mohamed morsi called for a draft referendum on the constitution december 15. >> i have spoken of a shining city all my political life. but i don't know if i ever quite communicated what i saw when i said it. in my mind was a tall proud city built on rocks strong than oceans. wind swept, god blessed and teeming with people of all kinds living in peace. it hummed with commerce and activity. if there had to be city walls, the walls had doors and the doors were open to anyone with the will and the heart to get here. that's how i saw it and see it still. megyn: a new report suggests president reagan's shining city on the hill what is getting increasingly tarnished. when reagan was president the u.s. was number one of best places to live. you are looking as the this year's results. see where we are today? wait for it. i see nothing. just the best places to be bo
mohamed morsi put in place his new voting rules as the protests turn violent ahead of the saturday's vote on the controversial constitutional referendum. the new rules restrict voters from casting their ballots outside their electoral districts which had been allowed in the past. this announcement comes just hours after masked gunmen attacked these opposition protesters, happening overnight in cairo's tahrir square. nine protesters were injured, four of them critically. their attackers fired bird shot pellets, threw molotov cocktails. what will the new voter rules mean for this week's referendum? >> reporter: i don't know if you hear me. i'm having trouble hearing you. but about an hour ago -- >> we're having a tough time hearing reza. we're going to work on that connection and bring him back up. because it is important to talk about what is happening now in anticipation of the weekend. let me get you caught up, though, on our lead story out of michigan. take a look. >> vo >> veto! >> the republican-led legislature passed two right to work bills just within this past hour. one is for publ
been marred of late thanks to mohamed morsi, the president of egypt earning him the moniker on atwitter of morsilini or mubarak with a beard, and now as we look around, we are not sure where this revolution is going and nor are we aware were the of the revolutions are going around the region. syria is teetering, georgia is burning, and the future is yet to be written. the question now is in all these countries will there be elections, will the islamists win? will it be one man, one vote or one-man, one-vote, one time. so with that we are going to debate the motion of democracy is the triumph in the middle east, it's up about box and is unavoidable and essential. we will have five minutes of opening remarks from each of our panelists today. we will start with ruel again to the good and go to brian and have q&a for myself as well as the audience and our panelists will be allowed to minutes at the end to restate their case and he essentially persuade you to believe what they believe. we will start now with ruel. ruel, you may begin. >> this is that such an angle. ruel, i'm confident you wi
to overthrow a dictator of 30 years, even if he was an american ally. and now you have mohamed morsi behaving like a, well, a dictator. and he's now got roughly 39, 40 political parties in egypt rising up against him. it is a mess. >> what you're seeing in places like egypt is the difference between democracy and majoritarianism. winning elections is the easy part. the question is whether they can govern, whether there's any tolerance for minorities, for multiple points of view. he did a power grab. there's now pushback. i think it's wrong to assume, though, that all the people pushing back are necessarily democrats. >> no. >> a lot of people are just going to try to take advantage. >> but everybody's pushing back, and certainly elements of mubarak's regime are looking for an opportunity to regain some power. but you also have coptic christian pushing back, other islamists pushing back, some even more extreme. >> exactly. >> you have all elements pushing back here. i'm absolutely bewildered as to why morsi thought he could get away with this. >> these are guys, morsi, who are either in jail o
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)

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